Programs & Services

Fort Selden

Established in 1865 in an effort to bring peace to south central New Mexico.

Fort Selden was built in the Mesilla Valley in 1865 to protect settlers and travelers from escalating hostilities as settlers encroached on the Mescalero Apache homelands. Fort Selden housed the famous Buffalo Soldiers, the name given to African American regiments by the Native Americans.

In 1880, the Chiricahua Apache leader Geronimo fled the confines of the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona to launch the final years of the Apache Wars. The military, fearing the worst, reoccupied Fort Selden, which they had abandoned just two years earlier.

During the next decade, Fort Selden was the home of a boy who would become a famous warrior himself — Douglas MacArthur, whose father was post commander. By 1890, hostilities had calmed, and in 1891, troops again were withdrawn from the fort.

New Mexico CulturePass

Your ticket to 15 exceptional Museums and Historic Sites. From Indian treasures to space exploration, world-class folk art to awesome dinosaurs—our museums and monuments celebrate the essence of New Mexico every day.
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Featured DCA Exhibitions

Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art

Sponge Bob Square Pants, Pac Man, and Curious George, all sporting a particularly Native American twist, are just a few images from popular mainstream culture seen in the exhibition, Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art.
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Generations

The Museum's first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.
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No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art

No Idle Hands examines a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.
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Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy

Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the exhibition will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.
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